Home » The Drama of Love and Death 1912 by Edward Carpenter
The Drama of Love and Death 1912 Edward Carpenter

The Drama of Love and Death 1912

Edward Carpenter

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230325620
Paperback
72 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER VIII THEMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER VIII THE UNDERLYING SELF Allowing, then, the great probability of the existence of an after-death state, and of a survival of some kind, the question further arises: Is that survival in any sense personal or individual? or does it belong to some, so to speak, formless region, either below or above personality? It is conceivable of course that there may be survival of the outer and beggarly elements of the mind, below personality- or it is conceivable that the deepest and most central core of the man may survive, far beyond and above personality- but in either case the individual existence may not continue. The eternity of the All-soul or Self of the universe is, I take it, a basic fact- it is from a certain point of view obvious- we have already discussed it, and, as far as this book is concerned, it is treated so much as an axiom that to argue further without it would be useless. That being granted, it follows that if the soul of each human being roots down ultimately into that All-self, the core of each soul must partake of the eternal nature. But as far as it does so it may be beyond all reach or remembrance or recognition of personality. Such a conclusion--whatever force of conviction may accompany it--is certainly not altogether satisfactory. I remember that once--in the course of conversation with a lady on this very subject--she remarked that though she thought there would be a future life she did not believe in the continuance of individuality. What do you believe in, then? said I. Oh, she replied, I think we shall be a sort of Happy Mass! And I have always since remembered that expression. But though the idea of a happy mass has its charms, it does not, as I say, quite satisfy either our feelings or our...